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[King of Buganda and self in motor car], 1908

 Item
Reference Code: GBR/0115/RCS/Y3011G/26

Scope and Contents

81 x 81 mm. Showing Bell and the young Kabaka of Buganda Daudi Chwa seated in the back seat of the motor car, with an unidentified European in the front seat. Hesketh Bell records the arrival of the motor car in Uganda: '20th April [1908] ... some months ago I ordered from Home a motor car for my use and a motor lorry, and they have arrived. Both are of 'Albion' make. These are the first motor cars ever seen in Uganda and they are making a great sensation among the natives. They are run partly on kerosene and partly on petrol and are, so far, giving good results. The lorry will be used for the transport of cotton and, if it prove a success, will certainly be followed by others.' (Bell 1946, p.179).

The African figure standing beside the motor car is Sir Apolo Kagwa, the Katikiro of Buganda.

Dates

  • 1908

Conditions Governing Access

Unless restrictions apply, the collection is open for consultation by researchers using the Manuscripts Reading Room at Cambridge University Library. For further details on conditions governing access please contact mss@lib.cam.ac.uk. Information about opening hours and obtaining a Cambridge University Library reader's ticket is available from the Library's website (www.lib.cam.ac.uk).

Language of Materials

English

Physical Characteristics and Technical Requirements

Good condition, apart from slight fading.

Existence and Location of Copies

Y3011D/31.

General

SG.

Date information

DateText: The date is approximate..

Originator(s)

Unknown

Finding aid date

2003-06-04 14:09:40+00:00

Includes index.

Repository Details

Part of the Cambridge University Library Repository

Contact:
Cambridge University Library
West Road
Cambridge CB3 9DR United Kingdom


The UK Archival Thesaurus has been integrated with our catalogue, thanks to Kings College London and the AIM25 project for their support with this.