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South African Protectorate, 1934-04 - 1939-04

 File
Reference Code: GBR/0014/AMEL 1/5/31

Scope and Contents

Papers and correspondence on the transfer of the protectorates of Basutoland [later Lesotho], Swaziland and Bechuanaland [later Botswana] to South Africa. Correspondents include: Sir John Harris, Secretary to the Anti-Slavery and Aborigines Protection Society, on the formation of the Parliamentary Committee on the position of the South African protectorates, and publishing a letter in the press on the future of the protectorates (10); 2nd Lord Selborne on the formation of the Committee (2); 1st Lord Lugard on pressing for reforms in administration of the protectorates; 11th Lord Lothian [earlier Philip Kerr] on changes to the Committee and interference from elements outside Parliament.

Also includes: memoranda by the Committee (in 1934 and an amended version in 1938) on the position of the South African protectorates and minutes of the preliminary meetings; print of an article by Lugard on government of the protectorates; memorandum by the Secretary of State for Dominion Affairs [James Thomas] on High Commission territories in South Africa; outline of policy followed by the South West Africa administration in Ovamboland [Namibia]; text of a speech by Lionel Curtis on the protectorates.

Dates

  • 1934-04 - 1939-04

Conditions Governing Access

The papers are open for consultation by researchers using Churchill Archives Centre, Churchill College, Cambridge.

Extent

1 file(s)

Language of Materials

English

Former / Other Reference

Box 153

Finding aid date

2003-09-25 15:38:15.140000+00:00

Repository Details

Part of the Churchill Archives Centre Repository

Contact:
Churchill Archives Centre
Churchill College
Cambridge Cambridgeshire CB3 0DS United Kingdom
+44 (0)1223 336087

The UK Archival Thesaurus has been integrated with our catalogue, thanks to Kings College London and the AIM25 project for their support with this.