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Proposals for railways, 1840 - 1848

 File
Reference Code: GBR/0180/RGO 6/448

Scope and Contents

Correspondence and papers regarding proposals for railways, including a paper on the proposed Great Northern Junction Railway, with a map by J. Blackmore; an article in 'The Sun' on rail links with Dublin; papers on the Eastern Union Railway, with a map of rules in Eastern England; J. Rennie's report on the London and Norwich Direct Railway; the prospectus of the Direct Northern Railway Company; a survey of Steddale Tunnel by T. Colby; a report by F. Smith on atmospheric railways (1842); a copy of 'The Railway Times' on atmospheric railways; work on improved engines for ascending inclines, with a print of Killmann's Patent locomotive and other drawings; material on Hopkin's Patent Safety rail; T. Greenhow's proposals for the easy location of railways (similar to Christaller's transport theories); a report in 'Iron Times' on a Norfolk railway accident; a report on the Menai Straits Tubular Bridge, with diagrams; an article in 'The Railway Chronicle' on resistance to trains at high speeds; work by Lord Wrottesley on the Iron Bridge Commission; and two railway maps of Britain. The correspondents include R. Sheepshanks, R. Stephenson, W. Cubitt, F. Beaufort, G. Clark, H. James and W. Fairbairn.

Dates

  • 1840 - 1848

Conditions Governing Access

Unless restrictions apply, the collection is open for consultation by researchers using the Manuscripts Reading Room at Cambridge University Library. For further details on conditions governing access please contact mss@lib.cam.ac.uk. Information about opening hours and obtaining a Cambridge University Library reader's ticket is available from the Library's website (www.lib.cam.ac.uk).

Extent

1 archive box(es) (1 box)

Language of Materials

English

The UK Archival Thesaurus has been integrated with our catalogue, thanks to Kings College London and the AIM25 project for their support with this.