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Correspondence with scientific societies, 1868 - 1873

 File
Reference Code: GBR/0180/RGO 6/413

Scope and Contents

Correspondence with various scientific societies, with related papers. There are reports of the Alnwick Scientific and Mechanical Institution; several pieces in the 'Journal of the Society of Arts' relating to the Institution of Naval Architects; S. Birch's address to the Society of Biblical Archaeology; a review of the French Academy of Sciences and the Danish Society of Sciences; the proceedings of the Antwerp Geophysical Congress; the claim of the Scottish Meteorological Society to a government grant, made in the 'Scotsman'; papers on the annual meetings of the Institution of Naval Architects, in 'Iron'; programmes for the Institution of Naval Architects, the Batavian Society and the Royal Institution; the prospectus for a Scientific Societies Club; writing on the Seaham Natural History Society in the 'Seaham Weekly News'; the constitution and address by C.W. Siemens to the Society of Telegraph Engineers; and papers on the foundation and objectives of the Victorian Institute, with a paper by J.H.T. Titcomb that was laid before the institute. The correspondents include L.A. Quetelet, G.D. Liveing, J.G. Bonney, C.E. Delaunay, A. de Morgan, F. Guthrie and F.J. Bolton.

Dates

  • 1868 - 1873

Conditions Governing Access

Unless restrictions apply, the collection is open for consultation by researchers using the Manuscripts Reading Room at Cambridge University Library. For further details on conditions governing access please contact mss@lib.cam.ac.uk. Information about opening hours and obtaining a Cambridge University Library reader's ticket is available from the Library's website (www.lib.cam.ac.uk).

Extent

1 archive box(es) (1 box)

Language of Materials

English

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