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Falkland Islands Dependencies, 1948

 Series
Reference Code: GBR/0115/RCS/Y3011U/554-564

Scope and Contents

A series of Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey photographs. This set of prints relates to the rescue of the party of scientists of the Falklands Islands Dependencies Survey who were trapped at their base at Hope Bay after the station was gutted by fire in November 1948. Each has the following typewritten caption on the reverse:
'Britain's Antarctic Outposts.
(See Feature Set Intro. No.240).
The story of John Biscoe's voyage to the Antarctic and of the eleven British scientists marooned on Stonington Island for two years has thrown a spotlight on to Britain's Antarctic possessions.
Britain staked a claim in the ice and snow of the Antarctic in 1908. The territories included Grahamland, the mainland mass, and the islands around - the South Shetlands, South Orkneys, and South Georgia. Scientific stations were set up by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey, and Britain has led in scientific research in these areas'.



Dates

  • 1948

Conditions Governing Access

Unless restrictions apply, the collection is open for consultation by researchers using the Manuscripts Reading Room at Cambridge University Library. For further details on conditions governing access please contact mss@lib.cam.ac.uk. Information about opening hours and obtaining a Cambridge University Library reader's ticket is available from the Library's website (www.lib.cam.ac.uk).

Language of Materials

English

General

SG.

Date information

DateText: Dated '1948' in the original typescript catalogue..

Originator(s)

Unknown

Finding aid date

2003-11-27 12:06:03+00:00

Includes index.

Repository Details

Part of the Cambridge University Library Repository

Contact:
Cambridge University Library
West Road
Cambridge CB3 9DR United Kingdom


The UK Archival Thesaurus has been integrated with our catalogue, thanks to Kings College London and the AIM25 project for their support with this.