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Correspondence of G.A. Harding, 1969 - 1973

 File
Reference Code: GBR/0180/RGO 15/200

Scope and Contents

Correspondence of G.A. Harding regarding administrative and astronomical matters, including letters concerning the occultations of Antares, 9 January 1969; a request for information on globular cluster NGC 6171, 29 January 1969; details of the Cape Transit Circle, 17 February 1969; maintenance work to be carried out on the 30-inch telescope, 17 April 1969; the specification for the prime focus plateholder mount on the Isaac Newton Telescope, 14 March 1969; defects in the R 40 plates, 5 September 1969; work on photometry, 16 September 1969 and 14 January 1970; the purchase of a laser, 18 March 1970; the Transit of Mercury, 9 May 1970; the testing of a zero corrector lens, 27 July 1970; problems with photometric plates taken on the 40-inch telescope, 7 September 1970; D-Max instructions for measuring photographic plates, 25 March 1971; adjustments to 40-inch optics, 18 June 1971; information on the six-inch collimator lenses of the Christie altazimuth; preparation of the Radical Velocity Annual, 5 April 1972; and administrative matters. The correspondents include the Revd R. Woolley, A. Hunter, Dr S.V.M. Clube, R.H. Tucker, C.A. Murray, R.H. Stoy, J.F. Hosie and Professor E.M. Burbidge.

Dates

  • 1969 - 1973

Conditions Governing Access

Unless restrictions apply, the collection is open for consultation by researchers using the Manuscripts Reading Room at Cambridge University Library. For further details on conditions governing access please contact mss@lib.cam.ac.uk. Information about opening hours and obtaining a Cambridge University Library reader's ticket is available from the Library's website (www.lib.cam.ac.uk).

Extent

1 bundle(s) (1 bundle)

Language of Materials

English

The UK Archival Thesaurus has been integrated with our catalogue, thanks to Kings College London and the AIM25 project for their support with this.