Skip to main content

Cambridge University Libraries are providing a blend of online and controlled in-person services. Please see our website for more details.

The Papers of Lord Jenkin of Roding

 Fonds
Reference Code: GBR/0014/JENK

Scope and Contents

Private and political papers, including: election material; political and personal correspondence; press cuttings and memorabilia; policy issue and legislation files, including papers from the House of Lords; articles and lectures; diaries.

Dates

  • 1951-08 - 2005-08

Creator

Conditions Governing Access

The papers are closed for cataloguing and conservation.

Conditions Governing Use

Once open, researchers wishing to publish excerpts from the papers must obtain prior permission from the copyright holders and should seek advice from Archives Centre staff.

Biographical / Historical

Patrick Jenkin was born on 7 September 1926, son of Mr and Mrs C. O. F. Jenkin. He was educated at the Dragon School, Oxford, then Clifton College before going on to study at Jesus College, Cambridge. In 1952 he married Alison Monica Graham, having two sons and two daughters.

After his National Service with the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders (1945-48), Jenkin returned to Cambridge to graduate with a 1st Class Honours degree in Law in 1951. He was the Harmsworth Scholar at the Middle Temple in the same year and was called to the Bar in 1952.

Combining a political career with business interests, Jenkin had a position at the Distillers Company Limited from 1957 up until 1970, but began life in the political arena as a member of first Hornsey Borough Council (1960-63), then of London Council of Social Service (1963-67). In 1964 Jenkin became MP for Winston Churchill's old constituency of Wanstead and Woodford in Essex, a seat which he was to hold until he stepped down in 1987. Promotion soon followed, with Jenkin becoming an Opposition front bench spokesman on Treasury, Trade and Economics (1965-70), also serving as Joint Vice-Chairman of the Conservative Parliamentary Trade and Power Committee (1966-67), then Chairman of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Chemical Industry (1968-70). With the Conservatives back in power under Edward Heath in 1970, Jenkin became first Financial Secretary, then from 1972 Chief Secretary to the Treasury, reaching ministerial rank in 1974 as Minister for Energy. While the Conservatives were out of office, he was Opposition front bench spokesman on Energy (1974-76), then on Social Services (1976-79). Returning to office with Margaret Thatcher, Jenkin became Secretary of State firstly for Social Services (1979-81), then for Industry (1981-83) and finally for the Environment (1983-85). Jenkin has also served as President of various organisations, including the National Conservative Political Centre Committee (1983-86) and the Greater London Area, National Union of Conservative Associations in 1989 (he was Vice-President from 1987 to 1989). He was made a Privy Counsellor in 1973 and a life peer in 1987. He died on 20 December 2016.

Extent

241 archive box(es)

Language of Materials

English

Other Finding Aids

Copies of this finding aid are available for consultation at Churchill Archives Centre, Cambridge and the National Register of Archives, London.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

The papers were given to Churchill Archives Centre by Lord Jenkin in August & December 2004 and November 2005.

General

This collection (fonds) level description was prepared by Katharine Thomson of Churchill Archives Centre, December 2004. Biographical information was obtained from "Who Was Who 1897-1996" (A and C Black).

Originator(s)

Jenkin, Charles Patrick Fleeming, 1926-2016, Baron Jenkin of Roding, politician

Date
2004-12-07 09:47:42.030000+00:00
Language of description
English
Script of description
Latin

Repository Details

Part of the Churchill Archives Centre Repository

Contact:
Churchill Archives Centre
Churchill College
Cambridge Cambridgeshire CB3 0DS United Kingdom
+44 (0)1223 336087

The UK Archival Thesaurus has been integrated with our catalogue, thanks to Kings College London and the AIM25 project for their support with this.