Skip to main content

Cambridge University Libraries are providing a blend of online and controlled in-person services. Please see our website for more details.

Richard Bastard, naval lieutenant: Quarterly account book.

 Fonds
Reference Code: GBR/0012/MS Add.9503

Scope and Contents

A leather bound pocket notebook (42 pages), covering the period from October 1807, just prior to Bastard's promotion to the rank of lieutenant, until 1822, when he had been on half pay for some time and was working temporarily in the merchant marine. At the front of the book, pages 1-28, there is a list of quarterly bills (loans), with their due dates, together with brief notes of Bastard's movements between vessels, with dates. These are followed by records of transactions; the mess account on board the Clorinde, November 1815 - July 1816; financial accounts with his agent, Edward Hatfield, 1807-1809; and private bills drawn on W.A. Standert, 1811-1813. Running from the back of the volume, pages 42-29, are rough notes of vessels he joined, including dates; a sequence of mess accounts, beginning November 1807 with various ships, and ending with the Clorinde in 1816; and brief statements of moneys received.

Dates

  • 1807-1822

Creator

Conditions Governing Access

Unless restrictions apply, the collection is open for consultation by researchers using the Manuscripts Reading Room at Cambridge University Library. For further details on conditions governing access please contact mss@lib.cam.ac.uk. Information about opening hours and obtaining a Cambridge University Library reader's ticket is available from the Library's website (www.lib.cam.ac.uk).

Extent

1 volume(s) (1 volume)

Language of Materials

English

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Purchased 1998
Language of description
English
Script of description
Latin

Repository Details

Part of the Cambridge University Library Repository

Contact:
Cambridge University Library
West Road
Cambridge CB3 9DR United Kingdom


The UK Archival Thesaurus has been integrated with our catalogue, thanks to Kings College London and the AIM25 project for their support with this.