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Kennet Papers

 Fonds
Reference Code: GBR/0012/MS Kennet

Scope and Contents

A collection comprising the papers of the Rt.Hon. Edward Hilton Young (1879-1960), 1st Lord Kennet of the Dene, the politician and writer, and those of his wife Kathleen (1878-1947), a noted sculptor and the widow of Captain Robert Falcon Scott, the explorer.
Lord Kennet's papers contain school letters and diaries, a series of correspondence with G.M Trevelyan and E.M. Forster, letters and diaries from his war years, political papers and letters including correspondence with Neville Chamberlain and Cabinet Papers. There are also papers relating to his many interests and to his career as a writer, including articles and broadcasts.
Lady Kennet's papers include many diaries, notebooks, letters and photographs, also notes for an autobiography.
There have also been subsequent deposits from the family.
A typed handlist is available in the Manuscripts Reading Room, the list contains details of some items that were not deposited.

Dates

  • 1892-1960

Creator

Conditions Governing Access

Restricted. Permission must be sought before consulting anything from this collection.

Extent

1 collection

Language of Materials

English

Arrangement

Towards the end of his life, Lord Kennet appears to have gone through his papers, and as far as possible his arrangement has been retained. The correspondence is listed alphabetically under writers' names, except those letters which Lord Kennet classified under subject matter, e.g. Liberal Party Secession amd Peerage.

Related Materials

See also the Sir Peter Scott collection.
Language of description
English
Script of description
Latin

Repository Details

Part of the Cambridge University Library Repository

Contact:
Cambridge University Library
West Road
Cambridge CB3 9DR United Kingdom


The UK Archival Thesaurus has been integrated with our catalogue, thanks to Kings College London and the AIM25 project for their support with this.