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Papers on the Nautical Almanac Office, 1894 - 1918

 File
Reference Code: GBR/0180/RGO 7/171

Scope and Contents

Correspondence concerning stars to be added to the apparent place list, including the listings, 1894.

Request from the Nautical Almanac Office for a proof copy of the 5-Year Catalogue, 1894.

Request for observations of the occultation stars for the 1898 'Nautical Almanac', with listings and observational results, 1894.

Observations of the minor planet Flora for the 'Nautical Almanac', 1894.

Correspondence on the existence of star BAC 5255, 1894.

Request for the absolute position of the Royal Observatory, 1894.

General correspondence with the Nautical Almanac Office, 1895, including requests for observations, with listings of the results. There is also a request from Canada for copies of early Almanacs.

General correspondence concerning the 'Nautical Almanac', 1897-1901, including letters from the Nautical Almanac Office concerning changes; a notice of the error in the lunar eclipse of January 1898; requests for changes in the 'Nautical Almanac'; papers on a proposal to insert day numbers; material on a reform of Finlay's Tables; and examination regulations for the N.A.O., 1899.

Correspondence with the Admiralty and the Nautical Almanac Office concerning simplifying the 'Nautical Almanac', 1910.

Proposals to employ R.A. Sampson's tables of Jupiter's satellites, 1910.

Correspondence with individuals concerning the 'Nautical Almanac', 1904-1918.

General correspondence concerning the Nautical Almanac Office, 1905-1917.

Correspondence with the Admiralty concerning Dr Downing's proposals for changes to the 'Nautical Almanac' and the results of the Paris conference, 1896-1899. There is also correspondence with W.J.L. Wharton of the Hydrographic Department and an extract from the special Royal Astronomical Society Committee report of 10 June 1898 regarding changes in the 'Nautical Almanac' astronomical constants.

Letter from the Nautical Almanac Office enclosing correspondence with S. Newcomb of Washington concerning his work on the constant of precession, 1897.

Two copies of a printed booklet issued by the Admiralty containing correspondence relating to changes in the 'Nautical Almanac', 1898.

Correspondence with S. Newcomb concerning his proposed changes in the constants, 1897-1898.

Correspondence and papers relating to the Royal Astronomical Society (Nautical Almanac Committee), 1897, including minutes of the meeting of 22 November 1897; copies of correspondence with the Admiralty and the United States Naval Observatory, and correspondence with H.H. Turner, Oxford, who acted as the Committee Secretary.

Memoranda and computations relating to proposed changes to the 'Nautical Almanac' [1898]. There are copies of the 'Astronomical Journal', 11 August and 27 September 1897, and 4 January, 2 February, 10 February, 19 February and 1 March 1898.

































Dates

  • 1894 - 1918

Conditions Governing Access

Unless restrictions apply, the collection is open for consultation by researchers using the Manuscripts Reading Room at Cambridge University Library. For further details on conditions governing access please contact mss@lib.cam.ac.uk. Information about opening hours and obtaining a Cambridge University Library reader's ticket is available from the Library's website (www.lib.cam.ac.uk).

Extent

1 bundle(s) (1 bundle)

Language of Materials

English

Former / Other Reference

Q11(2)

Immediate Source of Acquisition

RGO 7/171 includes some papers that were transferred from RGO 16, H.M. Nautical Almanac Office Papers, in October 1984.

Finding aid date

2006-03-30 10:45:28+00:00

Includes index.

Creator

Repository Details

Part of the Cambridge University Library Repository

Contact:
Cambridge University Library
West Road
Cambridge CB3 9DR United Kingdom


The UK Archival Thesaurus has been integrated with our catalogue, thanks to Kings College London and the AIM25 project for their support with this.