Skip to main content

Cambridge University Libraries are providing a blend of online and controlled in-person services. Please see our website for more details.

Papers on magnetic investigations, 1872 - 1893

 File
Reference Code: GBR/0180/RGO 7/110

Scope and Contents

Copies of letters of Sir George Airy, Astronomer Royal, concerning 'A new form of numerical expression of magnetic perturbations', 1872.

Copies of letters of Airy concerning papers giving the daily range of magnetic declination, 1878.

Copies of notes for the examination of diurnal magnetic curves, 1879.

Correspondence with W.J. Cockburn-Muir concerning the latitude of the north magnetic pole, 1879.

'A comparison of daily variation with sun spots', 1879.

'Monthly curves for the means of the years 1858-1863 representing the diurnal inequalities of magnetic horizontal forces at Greenwich', 1881.

Correspondence with General Strachey concerning harmonic coefficients [1884].

Correspondence with General Lefroy concerning the comparison of the Greenwich and Toronto photographic records of the movement of the declination and horizontal force magnets, 1885.

Notes and correspondence concerning the British Association Magnetic Committee and its work, 1885-1893.

Correspondence with A.J.S. Adams concerning the difference in point of time between the coincident Earth current and magnetic vibrations and disturbances, 1885-1891.

Correspondence with Professor Schering, 1887, regarding a suggestion that eye observations of magnetometers should be made at the time of the solar eclipse on 19 August 1887.

Correspondence with the Revd J.M. Bacon regarding an experiment concerning magnetic observations, 1888.

Correspondence with W.G. Adams concerning methods of finding mean declination, 1889.

Correspondence with E. Mascart concerning the engraving of curves of magnetic disturbances [1889] for publication, 1890-1893.

Correspondence with the Kew Observatory, 1890-1892, requesting information on the determination of magnetic diurnal inequality, 1891.

Correspondence with J.P. Hall concerning the comparison of magnetic data from 'Toronto, Genoea, Europe, Asia and Southern hemisphere' to discover how simultaneous certain phenomena, such as magnetic storms, prove to be, 1890.

Correspondence with G. Sack, Lübeck, requesting copies of the 'Magnetic and Meteorological results 1887' and related information, 1890.

Correspondence with A. Veeder of the United States of America concerning the connection between solar and magnetic disturbances, 1890-1891.

Abstract of a paper by William Ellis, assistant, delivered to the Royal Society by the Astronomer Royal and marked 'not for publication', 1892.

Papers relating to experiments carried out at the Royal Observatory concerning the shielding of magnetic instruments from the effects of a dynamo, 1893, including:

(i) An account of the experiment.

(ii) Abstract of the results.

(iii) Correspondence on the publication of the results.

(iv) Copy of the paper by the Astronomer Royal which appeared in 'The Electrician', 25 August 1893.

(v) Correspondence with Johnson and Phillips and others.

(vi) Copy of Professor Rücker's paper on dynamo-shielding, presented to the Physical Society, 10 October 1893.

















































Dates

  • 1872 - 1893

Conditions Governing Access

Unless restrictions apply, the collection is open for consultation by researchers using the Manuscripts Reading Room at Cambridge University Library. For further details on conditions governing access please contact mss@lib.cam.ac.uk. Information about opening hours and obtaining a Cambridge University Library reader's ticket is available from the Library's website (www.lib.cam.ac.uk).

Extent

1 bundle(s) (1 bundle)

Language of Materials

English

Former / Other Reference

K3

Finding aid date

2006-03-30 10:43:02+00:00

Includes index.

Creator

Repository Details

Part of the Cambridge University Library Repository

Contact:
Cambridge University Library
West Road
Cambridge CB3 9DR United Kingdom


The UK Archival Thesaurus has been integrated with our catalogue, thanks to Kings College London and the AIM25 project for their support with this.