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Miscellaneous astronomical papers, 1851 - 1853

 File
Reference Code: GBR/0180/RGO 6/248

Scope and Contents

Miscellaneous papers concerning astronomical matters, including letters from the Earl of Rosse, Professor J. Challis, I.K. Brunel, Sir J.F.W. Herschel, W. Lassell, A. de Morgan, W. De La Rue and Col. E. Sabine. The subjects covered include the lecture of Airy at the Royal Institution, 2 May 1851, on the total eclipse of the Sun, 28 July 1851; correspondence on the Adams Prize; printed sheets on Saturn's rings by W.C. Bond and G.P. Bond, originally from the 'Astronomical Journal', with an engraving; a galley proof by the Revd W.R. Dawes on the observations of the solar spots with large telescopes; a printed copy of a letter to the 'Whitehaven Herald' from J.E. Miller on solar spots; letters and a newspaper cutting on lunar atmosphere; a circular, with a diagram of Miss Readhouse's mode of the Moon; letters on W. Lassell's discovery of two satellites of Uranus; a letter from the British Association for the Advancement of Science on observations of the Moon; W. De La Rue's diagrams of Saturn; letters from I.K. Brunel on observatories in large steam ships, including a pamphlet titled 'Description of an Artificial Horizon' (invented by A.B. Becher); and correspondence on other subjects relating to astronomy.

Dates

  • 1851 - 1853

Conditions Governing Access

Unless restrictions apply, the collection is open for consultation by researchers using the Manuscripts Reading Room at Cambridge University Library. For further details on conditions governing access please contact mss@lib.cam.ac.uk. Information about opening hours and obtaining a Cambridge University Library reader's ticket is available from the Library's website (www.lib.cam.ac.uk).

Extent

1 archive box(es) (1 box)

Language of Materials

English

The UK Archival Thesaurus has been integrated with our catalogue, thanks to Kings College London and the AIM25 project for their support with this.