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Personal correspondence, A-H, 1959 - 1960

 File
Reference Code: GBR/0180/RGO 10/910

Scope and Contents

Personal correspondence of Sir Richard Woolley regarding invitations, awards, lectures, committees, dinners and other subjects. There is correspondence with newspapers and magazines concerning books and articles; with tradesmen, banks and insurance companies; with individuals, including Dr Atkinson, Sir Edward Appleton, Sir Allen Brown at Australia House, G. de Beer, Professor Bondi, K. St. B. Collins, Sir N. Cooper-Key M.P., Sir John Carroll, Sir Durnford Slater, Sir H. Spencer Jones, Professor Mott, Dr Eggen, Professor Bondi, Dr D. Evans, Dr Gottleib, F. Hoyle, Viscount Hailsham, W. Heintz, A. Hunter and Sir E. Hodge; and with societies, universities, schools, observatories and other institutions, including the Australian Academy of Sciences, the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, the Australian and New Zealand Association for the Advancement of Science, the Royal Academy of Arts, the Archimedeans, Sir William Boreman's Foundation, Buckingham Palace, the British Museum, the Clockmakers' Company, Sir Howard Grubb, Parsons and Co. Ltd, the Drapers' Company, Gonville and Caius College and various Herstmonceux societies, including Herstmonceux Football Club and Herstmonceux Cricket Club.

Dates

  • 1959 - 1960

Conditions Governing Access

Unless restrictions apply, the collection is open for consultation by researchers using the Manuscripts Reading Room at Cambridge University Library. For further details on conditions governing access please contact mss@lib.cam.ac.uk. Information about opening hours and obtaining a Cambridge University Library reader's ticket is available from the Library's website (www.lib.cam.ac.uk).

Extent

1 bundle(s) (1 bundle)

Language of Materials

English

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