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Crabbe, George, 1754-1832 (poet and Church of England clergyman)

 Person

Dates

  • Existence: 1754 - 1832

Biography

George Crabbe (1754-1832), poet, was born at Aldeburgh, Suffolk, on 24 December 1754, and was mostly self-taught. He was employed in a warehouse on the quay at Slaughden until 1768, before working as a servant for country doctors, 1768-1775. Crabbe published verses between 1772 and 1775, and studied botany and surgery, practising the latter at Aldeburgh. He was ordained deacon in 1781, and became curate of Aldeburgh in that year. He was chaplain to the Duke of Rutland at Belvoir, 1782-1785, and was presented to small livings in Dorset in 1783. In 1783 the Archbishop of Canterbury conferred Crabbe with the degree of LL.B. He was appointed curate at Stathern, Leicestershire, in 1785, and subsequently became rector of Muston, Leicestershire, and, in 1789, the non-resident vicar of Allington, Lincolnshire. He was resident as vicar of Trowbridge, Wiltshire, 1814-1832, and the non-resident vicar of Croxton, Leicestershire. Crabbe died on 3 February 1832. His collected works were published in 1834.

Found in 1 Collection or Record:

 Fonds

George Crabbe: Notebooks, catalogue of his library and literary compositions

Reference Code: GBR/0012/MS Add.4422-4426
Dates: 1812-1826
Conditions Governing Access: Unless restrictions apply, the collection is open for consultation by researchers using the Manuscripts Reading Room at Cambridge University Library. For further details on conditions governing access please contact mss@lib.cam.ac.uk. Information about opening hours and obtaining a Cambridge University Library reader's ticket is available from the Library's website (www.lib.cam.ac.uk).

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  • Type: Collection X
  • Subject: Poetry X

The UK Archival Thesaurus has been integrated with our catalogue, thanks to Kings College London and the AIM25 project for their support with this.